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SCIENCE BEHIND

Glucosamine is a simple molecule that is used by the body to form connective tissue, tendons, and ligaments. It is found naturally in high concentrations in joint structures throughout the body. It plays an important role in making glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, which are essential building blocks of many parts of your joints, including ligaments, tendons, cartilage and synovial fluid.

Need

Although the body makes its own glucosamine, supplements can be helpful in some situations, especially since the natural sources of the substance are inedible. Also, as we age, the levels in the body may decrease.

Availability

Glucosamine is available as a supplement, usually derived from the shells of oysters, crabs, and shrimp. A synthetic form is made in laboratories, also. The supplements are available as tablets and capsule. A commonly used dosage is 1500 mg per day but it may vary as per preparation.
Chondroitin sulfate is an amino sugar polymer, made up of glucuronic acid and galactosamine. It is a major component of the extracellular matrix. Chondroitin sulfate is an important structural component of cartilage and is responsible for most of its resistance to compression. As a major component of cartilage, chondroitin sulfate helps cushion the joints. Chondroitin sulfate is believed to provide structure, hold water and nutrients, and promote elasticity in cartilage.

Need

It is considered an essential substance for the maintenance of healthy joints.

Availability

Chondroitin sulfate usually comes from animal cartilage
Hyaluronic Acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body. It is found in the highest concentrations in fluids in the eyes and joints. Hyaluronic Acid , also called hyaluronan, is an anionic, glycosaminoglycan distributed widely throughout connective, epithelial and neural tissues. It is unique among glycosaminoglycans in that it is non-sulfated. Hyaluronic acid works by acting as a cushion and lubricant in the joints and other tissues. In addition, it might affect the way the body responds to injury.

Need

The loss of hyaluronic acid appears to contribute to joint pain and stiffness of joints. Studies indicate that supplemental hyaluronic acid may coax the joint into increasing its own production of this important substance, which may in turn help to preserve cartilage

Availability

Hyaluronic acid is available as a supplement, independently and in combination with other supplements. the common dosage are 120-240 mg per day.
Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring organosulfur compound in the human body. MSM is the oxidized byproduct of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). It has board biological effects and is known to act as a crucial building block for bones and joints. Some of the scientist have found it to be useful in alleviating pain, promoting oral hygiene and other skin related issues.

Need

Sulfur is an essential building block for proteins and is vital to the creation and regeneration of the body’s tissues including joints, cartilage, skin, hair and nails. Sulfur supports many vital biochemical processes in the body, including energy production. It has been shown to reduce joint pain significantly and improve mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The levels are shown to be declining with age in the body.

Availability

It is a naturally‐occurring compound that is found in many foods including meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables. MSM is available as dietary supplement and used in conjunction with Glucosamine and Chondroitin.
Boswellia Serrata or Shallaki, is a tropical plant which has potent anti-inflammatory properties.It is a prescribed medicine in ayurvedic system and has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine and its usage extends to the Middle East and other tropical regions. The key constituents of Shallaki are volatile oil (4-8%), resin (56-65%) and gum (20-36%). The triterpenoids are the active constituents and are collectively called boswellic acids. The gum resin of B. serrata usually contains 43% boswellic acids, which contain a combination of six major constituents, mainly 3 acetyl, 11 keto, boswellic acids (AKBA), which help to preserve the structural integrity of joint cartilage. It prevents swelling at joints, and prevents breakdown of cartilage, and is thus an effective remedy against osteoarthritis and has been shown to provide effect in as less as a week.The anti inflammatory effects come via its active boswellic acids, appears to be a novel inhibitory of a pro-inflammatory enzyme called 5-Lipoxygenase and may possess other anti-inflammatory effects (such as nF-kB inhibition) It has also been reportedly found to provide significant reductions in swelling and pain for rheumatoid arthritis.

Need

It has been shown to reduce inflammation,swelling and breakdown of cartilage in all types of joint related chronic ailments.

Availability

It has to be taken as supplement as there’s no way of taking it through our regular diet.
AKBA (3-O-Acetyl-11-keto-β-Boswellic acids) – Among all Boswellia Acids only specific boswellic acids known as AKBA having a keto functional group are more active for anti inflammatory activity. It has been shown in many studies that other terpenes lacking these functional groups actually reverse and dilute the activity of AKBA. Considering that β-boswellic acid is the major component of Boswellia serrata extract, it becomes important that this component be removed or reduced from the extract to prevent the above-mentioned undesirable effect. Many commercial Boswellia serrata extracts contain at least 6 boswellic acids with the most active constituent, AKBA being present to the least amount, typically 1– 2.5%. In comparison our product contains only 3 boswellic acids while enhancing the more active AKBA content eight to ten times. It exhibits potential anti-inflammatory properties by reducing proinflammatory modulators, and it may improve joint health by reducing the enzymatic degradation of cartilage in osteoarthritis.

Need

It has been shown to reduce inflammation,swelling and breakdown of cartilage in all types of joint related chronic ailments.

Availability

It has to be taken as supplement as there’s no way of taking it through our regular diet.
Curcumin – Turmeric contains different bioactive components, mainly curcumin and demethoxycurcumin, bis-demethoxycurcumin, and turmeric essential oils. When used as an alternative medicine or dietary supplement, turmeric is typically used as an extract that is standardized to 80–95% curcuminoids, primarily curcumin. Turmeric and its derivatives have anti-inflammatory activities.Research shows that curcumin (from turmeric) has anti-inflammatory effects, and may be helpful for conditions such as ulcerative colitis, muscle soreness after exercise, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the knee. it is traditionally used condiment in India. There are no health risks in using turmeric as a spice added to food and a curcumin supplement could be beneficial to your health.

Need

It has been shown to reduce inflammation,swelling and breakdown of cartilage in all types of joint related chronic ailments.

Availability

It has to be taken as supplement as there’s no way of taking it through our regular diet.
Vitamin C
Vitamin D

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